West End theatres to stay closed until May 31 | Extended shutdown hits comedy shows

West End theatres to stay closed until May 31

Extended shutdown hits comedy shows

All the theatres in London's West End will remain shuttered until at least May 31, it was announced this morning.

The news from the Society of London Theatre indicates the coronavirus shutdown measures are unlikely to be lifted before then.

Comedy shows affected include Ross Noble (pictured) at the London Palladium; A run of Richard Gadd's one-man show Baby Reindeer at the Ambassadors, which was also planning a run of late-night comedy shows featuring the likes of Lloyd Griffith, Suzi Ruffell and Bridget Christie; and a performance of Adam Kay's NHS stories  This Is Going To Hurt at the Garrick Theatre

The theatre body said in a statement: 'We are now cancelling all performances up until and including May 31 to help us process existing bookings while we wait for further clarity from the government in terms of when we will be able to reopen. 

'We are so sorry that in these testing and difficult times you are not able to enjoy the show you have booked for and hope the following helps clarify next steps in respect of your tickets. 

'There is nothing that you need to do if your performance has been cancelled, but we do ask for your patience. If you have booked directly with the theatre or show website for an affected performance, please be assured that they will contact you directly to arrange an exchange for a later date, a credit note/voucher or a refund. If you have booked via a ticket agent they will also be in contact with you directly.'

On Friday, The Ambassador Theatre Group, which runs several regional venues across the UK including Glasgow's King's Thetre, the Manchester Opera House and Place Theatre and Theatre Royal Brighton, as well as West End sites, announced that all its theatres will remain closed until the end May.

Published: 6 Apr 2020

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