The reluctant village people: Bad Move returns | The best of the week's comedy on TV and radio

The reluctant village people: Bad Move returns

The best of the week's comedy on TV and radio

The week's best comedy on TV and radio…

Monday September 17

ALL STAR DRIVING SCHOOL: Mark Watson joins the reality show this week - getting very nervous behind the wheel as he tries to bag a driving licence. Singer Tallia Storm, and Hollyoaks' Ruby O'Donnell are also joining the show, which is stripped every day across the week.E4, 7.30pm

TRAVEL MAN Richard Ayoade is joined by current Taskmaster contestant Jessica Knappett for 48 hours in Ibiza, including the island's version of Stonehenge.Channel 4, 8.30pm

Wednesday September 19

BAD MOVE: Jack Dee and Kerry Godliman return in the sitcom about a couple whose rose-tinted fantasy of an idyllic country lifestyle is proving very elusive, as the confront problems such as infestation of moths and a septic tank that's 'backing up'. The supporting cast includes Miles Jupp as the smug neighbour and Seann Walsh as rock star Grizzo who lives nearby. ITV, 8pm


COMEDY CENTRAL AT THE COMEDY STORE: Tonight Phil Wang hosts Stephen Bailey, Huge Davis and Sophie Willan. Comedy Central, 10.30pm. Here's an extract from Willan's set:

Thursday September 20

ROB & ROMESH vs ANTHONY JOSHUA: Rob Beckett and Romesh Ranganathan interviewed Anthony Joshua ahead of his fight against Wladmir Klitschko last year. Now they return for a second round ahead of his Wembley showdown against Alexander Povetkin on Saturday.

Friday September 21

THE MARY WHITEHOUSE EXPERIENCE: The Radio 1 show was where it all started for David Baddiel, Rob Newman, Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis, two double-acts getting their broadcast break in 1989. Now the sketch and stand-up hybrid is being repeated on Radio 4 Extra with Mark Thomas and Donna McPhail guesting in the opening episode. Radio 4 Extra, 11pm/p>

CROWDSCIENCE: WHAT'S THE POINT OF LAUGHTER: A question no comedy fan should probably ask, but this World Service programme tries to figure out why the violent and repetitive involuntary constriction of the chest muscles is so infectious and so important for human social interactions. BBC World Service, 8.30pm

Published: 16 Sep 2018

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