What makes Dylan Moran funny | The best comedy on demand

What makes Dylan Moran funny

The best comedy on demand

This week's best comedy shows on demand

What makes Dylan Moran funny?

Ryan Hollinger releases a weekly video essay analysing art and entertainment. And this week he is looking at the comic techniques of Dylan Moran. You might not agree with all the conclusions, but if you like to dissect your comedy, there are some talking points here:

Double Act

The latest short film from online production house Turtle Canyon, is about an double act from a bygone era of TV, on their uppers and riven with hatred. It stars Ed Aczel and Michael Brunström, was written by Joz Norris and directed by Matthew Highton.

Storyline: The comedy soap

Former soap writer Neil Docking, who has worked on Casualty, Emmerdale and Coronation Street, has created an online sitcom based on his experiences – which he's taken online after finding little interest from traditional broadcasters. Their reservations about finding an audience might have been justified: Although Docking raised £11,000 through crowdfunding to make Storyline, its four episodes have racked up just 3,000 views so far, despite getting a news story given the best part of a page in the London Evening Standard.

Something More

Simon Amstell has directed the new pop video for former Klaxons frontman James Righton. The musician is using the name Shock Machine for his new project, and Amstell wrote and directed the short film to accompany his latest release, Something More. It is based on the idea of the sad clown; with Righton wiping off the make-up to become the only person in his world to be showing his real face, while everyone has a painted visage. The film was preciously screened on Channel 4's Random Acts short film strand and can now be seen here:

Book Shambles

And as mentioned, here, a new horror-themed episode of Robin Ince and Josie Long's podcast is out now in which Reece Shearsmith reveals a character written for the League Of Gentlemen, but which never made it into the TV or radio series and Rufus Hound reads a creepy tale from HP Lovecraft.

Published: 23 Jul 2016

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