Mock around the clock

Comedy's first 24-hour show

For most comics, the first full-length Edinburgh show can be a challenge, with the demands writing a full hour entails.

But Mark Watson has set his sights even higher ­ with a record-breaking attempt at the first round-the-clock show.

His honestly-titled Overambitious 24-Hour show will run from one minute to midnight on August 22 to the same time on August 23.

And former Cambridge Footlights member Watson, who recently published his first novel Bullet Points, is also planning to write a tie-in book chronicling the event.

The 24-year-old says he was inspired by David Blaine's much-publicised 'in-a-box' stunt - and by returning to the Fringe's experimental spirit.

He said: "It won't all be stand-up, there will also be a mini-play, sketches,a parody of Channel 4's 100 Greatest shows, celebrity guests, multimedia bits that aren't shit, perhaps an entire film, 'satellite links' to other shows and more.

"More ideas are being added by the day - apart from when it's a bit of a slow day.

"Everyone knows that there's more stuff going on in Edinburgh than you can possibly cope with. It's so hard to know whether you should be watching comedy, or contemporary dance, or just glassing someone on the Royal Mile who's been singing the same song since dawn.

"Well, with this you can see everything in one go. It's less like the Edinburgh festival, more like a rock festival ­ pay once, probably only about three quid, and come back as often, or as little, as you like."

All he needs now is a venue.

He's looking for a centrally-located building that will let him run for a full 24 hours, and accommodate an audience of 30 or more.

He added: "It needs to be available cheaply, as this isn't the most economically sensible venture ­ although the same could be said of the entire festival, for comedians, at least. "

If you can help, email aninterestingbloke@hotmail.com

Published: 30 Apr 2004

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